Most important of all, you can not … Give it a read. There is no ultimate winner or loser. In The Infinite Game, Sinek applies game theory to explore how great businesses achieve long-lasting success. There are no repetitive examples and stories, the summaries are simple and straight-forward and I am simply blown away by the first listen (I'm an audiobook enthusiast), I can wait to start. Here is a review by Alex Beattie in the Scoop Review of Books and here is one by Susie Burke in The Australian Community Psychologist. For the first half of the book I thought “a typical Sinek: Good Message but probably could have been half the pages”. In finite games, like football or chess, the players are known, the rules are fixed, and the endpoint is clear. The North Vietnamese played the Infinite Game.Through a wide range of examples, Sinek explores how infinite players in any field can exhaust their competitors, stay ahead for the long run, and create strong organizations, built to weather nearly any storm. Leaders Eat Last was similarly inspiring. It probably could have been a tweet stream more than a book, but overall it was still a pretty good read (and I definitely like the premise overall, even if its a bit simplistic). I just think there was a lot of the same points made over and over for a premise that might not have been worthy of an entire book. And the same stories of success: apple vs. microsoft, Blockbuster vs. Netflix, etc. The Infinite Game is a book by Simon Sinek published in 2019. Calendar it! If you buy the book through these links, I might earn a small commission based on total expense. Look for the greater good, the just cause, the higher ethical road. How does this book already have 43 ratings if it doesn't come out for another month and a half? However, he also notes that a Cause is not the same as a Goal or an Objective, and focused on the fact that profit is not a cause, but rather the fuel to advance a cause. I'll give this book a rather generous 4 stars. Like children who mirror their parents, so too do employees mirror their leaders. Review: The Infinite Game - How to Lead in the 21 Century tl;dr: See summary below. There are no repetitive examples and stories, the summaries are simple and straight-forward and I am simply blown away by the first listen (I'm an audiobook enthusiast), I can wait to start over again with a pen and paper as there are plenty of stuff that I need to get my head around written inside. In an Infinite Game, players play to keep playing. Sinek does well to differentiate between the finite game of business with clear cut winners and losers and the infinite game played by long term visionaries who take a more nuanced look at capitalism. Basically, the point is that it if you only focus on the near-term results you'll lose over the long term. Milton Friedman and Wall Street come off roughly as the villians in the new form (according to the author) of share price maximization and management compensation fraud that permeates our public companies. The “game” of leadership and business is an infinite game where the rules change frequently, competitors come and go, and there is no end point to the game. Sinek gives powerful and encouraging words to addressing the tension felt in profit driven leadership and argues for a human centered mindset that orbits around vision and mission, what he calls a "Just Cause". It probably could have been a tweet stream more than a book, but overall it was still a pretty good read (and I definitely like the premise overall, even if it’s a bit simplistic). Is this, basically, an author trying to popularize the ideas already written about in Finite and Infinite Games by James P. Carse? Sinek’s links this a lot with the concept of Servant Leadership and to that of service orientation, as both allow the organisation to be more infinite-minded. The author analyses positively the current effort of many companies to define their purpose. Global Leadership Network. Talking about the Cause allows Sinek also to discuss a revision of the Responsibility of Business, a topic that has lately been very much discussed, reviewing the link between advancing a purpose, satisfying customers and generating profit. I got the first warning with Find Your WHY that Sinek's "best before" might be passing but I ignored this warning hoping to find something at the level of Start with WHY or Leaders Eat Last, but this book does not reach to that level. At the moment, there is no story and no quests. The Infinite Game - A Book Review - Finite Vs Infinite Mindset Published on April 16, 2020 April 16, 2020 • 107 Likes • 25 Comments Access the introduction page and give your feedback. We are the finite players in the infinite game of life. In an Infinite Game, players play to keep playing. The more Simon started to understand the difference between finite and infinite games, the more he began to see infinite games all around us. Our lives are finite, but life is infinite. Finite and Infinite Initiatives in the Business World. I did not like for the same reason I knew I was not going to like it: it's a book full of cherrypicked stories of success and failure that tries to tie up a theory into a neat binary that shows how to fail and how to succeed. As someone who values adaptability […] We are the finite players in the infinite game of life. Following in the footsteps of James P. Carse, Simon Sinek calls on organizations to think of themselves as infinite players rather than finite ones in. It hits important ideas like "vision" and "values" from the management perspective. November 11, 2020 November 7, 2020 by Jerome Bongaerts. Sinek does well to differentiate between the finite game of business with clear cut winners and losers and the infinite game played by long term visionaries who take a more nuanced look at capitalism. You can lean into these strengths to strategically play the infinite game. This book is by far the best one coming out of the author. I don't normally like business inspiration books, but The Infinite Game doesn't hold back. The Framework can be downloaded as PDF as well. The Infinite Game is the last book by Simon Sinek. And this is the case of organisations: most managers think of them as playing to win, by the rules of a finite game. If they want someone else to play the game they designed, kids must share the device. You are either ahead or behind. And the same stories of success: apple vs. microsoft, Blockbuster vs. And full disclosure: I’m a Simon Sinek stan and I have been powerfully moved by Start With/Find Your Why and it was a catalyst for wholesale review of my leadership approach. The objective of infinite games such as the Cold War is merely to keep playing. He finds that building long-term value and healthy, enduring growth - that playing the infinite game - is the only thing that matters to your business. Kids can create, play, and modify their own arcade-style games. Courageous leaders prioritise people before numbers and are strictly focused on delivering service. I started to see that many of the struggles that organizations face exist simply because their leaders were playing with a finite mindset in an infinite game. When finite players play other finite players, or when infinite players face off against other infinite players, the game remains stable. The only existing terms are ahead or behind. Basically, the point is that it if you only focus on the near-term results you'll lose over the long term. Like many business books, it uses the formula of taking a simple premise and attributing the success of every successful company to simply following the title of the book. However, for the first half of the book, there is little support for the case. Great leaders instinctively play the infinite game rather than chase short-term gains. These are potential areas to improve. I would best describe this as a whiny rant against the modern incarnation of capitalism and the psycho and sociopaths that run them. However, after the occurrences of 9/11, it was prohibited from airline carry-on luggage and sales fell. This is a review of the book and not the concept. Sinek identifies five essential practices for leaders that want to adopt an infinite mindset: Sinek’s ability with words is known, and the book proceeds smoothly through examples and anecdotes looking at the various steps identified above. This is a direct clear slap in the face to those who view success as the only worthwhile pursuit in life. Click here for a podcast in which Maria Armoudian and I discuss The Infinite Game and here for an interview with Kathryn Ryan on RNZ. Review of The Infinite Game: How Great Businesses Achieve Long-lasting Success by Simon Sinek.. I would best describe this as a whiny rant against the modern incarnation of capitalism and the psycho and sociopaths that run them. I've always been troubled by Friedman's ethics free approach to business in a world without morals or common cause beyond profit maximization. The game ends when that objective is reached. To ask, “What’s best for us” is infinite thinking.”. I was going to avoid reading this book and I knew I was going to fail to avoid reading this book because these sorts of books are my weakness. He admits himself, infinite games are not a new idea, but one that he is trying to popularize. Access a free review of The Infinite Game, by Simon Sinek and 20,000 other business, leadership and nonfiction books on getAbstract. Victorious is a good player in the Infinite Game, the business that creates the Swiss Army knife. However, when a finite player competes against an infinite player, problems arise because their objectives are quite different. Links to Books on this page may direct to the Amazon website. Consistency and Intentional Design. Refresh and try again. I'll give this book a rather generous 4 stars. Well written with lots of good advice, as usual. Parents need to know that The Infinite Arcade by Tinybop is a video-game-design app. Simon Sinek is an optimist. Opting for the Nvidia GTX 1070 graphics card handles both the VR application and gaming facility is one of the economic choices with a good performance level. The objective is to perpetuate the game. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. There are no winners or losers in an infinite game… I was annoyed by the fact how the author was conflicting with his own preaching (tolerance and seeking synergies) when coming back again and again to criticize Jack Welch (General Motors), Microsoft (while over-idealizing Apple), Collins and others. It starts slow and seemingly as pure author conjecture. It's not a list of great CEOs, it's a list of the worst CEOs and how we can learn from their mistakes. the willingness to take risks for the good of an unknown future. October 15th 2019 Sinek had an interesting idea, one that is worth exploring: finite VS infinite games. Simon Sinek, The Infinite Game ——————– Simon Sinek helps us remember the basics; very important basics. If you want to get a feel for what Simon Sinek is teaching in the book, then you may want to read this article. It should be a (very good) medium post, in my view. While the book is focused on business, the idea of finite/infinite thinking is broadly applicable. We’d love your help. The New York Times-bestselling author of Start With Why, Leaders Eat Last, and Together Is Better offers a bold new approach to business strategy by asking one question: are you playing the finite game or the infinite game? Book Review: The Infinite Game by Simon Sinek, Hardcover | 272 pp. I got the first warning with Find Your WHY that Sinek's "best before" might be passing but I ignored this warning hoping to find something at the level of Start with WHY or Leaders Eat Last, but this book does not reach to that level.